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. it is within our reach to lead in job growth and energy independence. it is within our reach to balance our budget and meet the needs of our people. our place, kan., must show the path, the difficult path for america to go in these troubled times. .. the and >> we and shannon >> thank you. >> that was governors sam brownback with the state of the state address. we now go to senator anthony headley for the democratic response to enact we have been talking that the string that we have time. we have talked about how i have a dream. we will somehow realizes principles and the declaration of independence. i think he was just inspired by that moment. >> sunday on "after words", clairborne carson recalls his march on washington. it is part of three days of the tv this weekend on monday featuring authors and books from the inauguration. president obama, and martin luther king jr. >> every weekend latest nonfiction authors and books are featured on booktv. you can see past programs and schedules our website and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> congress talked about avoiding
of the denying quorum and in the case of speaking as long as you cou could, you had to spend time and energy, you had to organize and it was visible before this body. it was visible before the reporters gathered in the balcony. therefore, the american people, long before there was a television camera here, could see what you were doing and the public could provide feedback on that. but now we come to the modern era. from 1970 forward. in which it became popular to start using the objection as an instrument of party warfare, the objection to a final vote. you know, if we turn back before 1970, you had an overlap of the parties of perhaps 30 members. and so if one had used his objection, they'd have a good sense that you would be able to get cloture. furthermore, there was a social contract that you only interrupted the workings of this body on an issue of deep principle. you only blockaded the operations of the senate on an issue of profound concern to your state. not as a routine instrument of party politics. but that's changed over the last 45 years, since 1970 forward, the last 43 years, in whi
we call the power platform, the energy grid needs to be redone, and the knowledge platform. we don't -- we need to do some work on the networks, which is to say broadband, but it's really about how do we apply it? how do we deliver band width that can change education, change health care, change all government services, we get faster, cheaper, better, the same phenomenon on our phones and in our networks, we want to see in public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: mr. levin, how important is speed when it comes to improving our economy? >> guest: depends on a variety of different uses. for example in medicine, we're now moving to a place where we can have wireless sensors improve medicine and that's great. but business uses and other thing things, cameras, geneomic medicine, there's faster networks, president clinton was was dell and he said we can't expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access the speed of korea, and he is absolutely right. >> reed hundt, energy is included in your book on technology. why? >> guest: to quote th
that energy companies will have to put people on the lowest tariffs. that is a record we can be proud of. >> steve basic. >> mr. speaker -- [inaudible] my constituency is enb during a hideous regulatory fast thanks to the health and safety executive and the european union. the british economy is very reliant on small and medium businesses far less able to cope with bad regulation particularly when it's badly administer inside the u.k. >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. businesses large and small are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just the burden of regular ration from europe -- regulation from europe, but more generally. and that is why we should be fighting in europe for a more flexible europe and a europe where we see regulations come off. but the view of the party opposite is sit back, do nothing and never listen to the british people or british business either. >> order! >> here on c-span2 we'll leave the british house of commons now as today move on to other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's question time aired live wednesdays at 7
companies, and it is producing more than ever in energy from other sources, both domestically and from other places, and i think that's great. i think that we import around a million dollars a day from venezuela. this is me speaking. i'm not being paid by anybody but i sure would love to see a million barrels of oil coming down the pipeline from alberta to houston. within that the need? is that a coincidence? i think that would be terrific. so, i remember threats by the governor of venezuela not a single drop of oil will go to the united states. great. i think what we need to do is remove that leverage over our economy and we have done it and we should continue to do so. >> it's my understanding, this is a question of fact that it's my understanding the only country that is playing is really the united states and basically they are getting a discounted rate so on terms of the more favorable to respect people on the audience know more about this. >> i don't know who is paying what for what. >> venezuela is subsidizing cuba and the cuban economy at the rate of $4 billion a year out of 60 billi
such as japan experienced has ranged in terms of lessons learned just beyond the energy sector and the nuclear industry to many other areas that could experience similar events. >> okay. and going in -- to the effect on auto industry, are there things that have changed in terms of resilience with the auto industry, in terms of the supply chain or things that changed since fiewk fukushima? >> yes, i think there's a tremendous change take place. i think we have probably about 400 tier one suppliers. anything beyond the tier two down to event tier five, we didn't have not have any -- [inaudible] and we assume that supply chain shape like pyramids and suppliers take care of several tier two, three, and four. what we found in the case especially the semiconductor companies. it's almost like a spindle shape, and we are very surprised, and therefore, we have to make a -- supply chain even down to a tier five. so this work has immediately start. and what we have found is that there are about 2,000 critical parts where there's on one single suppliers or one special use. and therefore, there's no -- lik
that everybody should rely on the energy and force of newton, i would caution not to do that. it's galvanized to have a conversation internally and have a serious conversation, but for the assault weapons ban, were done with columbine would have been in virginia. i do believe in the last four years, the last eight years of politics, what happened there has made all of us have a discussion and appropriate politics to be focused for the president to introduce this legislation or package undecided what is going to do by executive order. but we are at a tipping point is postponed, delayed or for whatever reason hasn't happened. my small plaintiff caution anything but the last time i had success, goes back in 93 and 94. those were pretty columbine. his entire package fell flat. >> congressman, you had a reading from the nra. you voted for reducing the waiting time for weapons from reduced to one day. do you think we are at a tipping point, but there'll be some kind of a seismic change? >> since the topic of politics, i would add a lot of people lately accredit 1993 crime bill for the reason republ
on the energy and force of newton, i would caution not to do that. it's galvanized the country to have an honest conversation and look internally and had a serious conversation. but the assault weapon ban was done without a columbine would have been in virginia. i do believe just in the last four years on the loudspeakers of politics would have been there has made all of us a discussion that is sitting on the sideline to be focused to introduces legislation or package and decide what legislatively he's going to do by executive order. but we are at a tipping point to have a discussion that's been postponed, delayed. but my small flashing yellow light of caution is anything to laugh time we really had success, which goes back to 93 and 94, those are pretty columbine. his entire package of five. spin a congressman, you had a reading from the nra and he voted for reducing the waiting time from three days to one bag. do you think read a tipping point, that there will be some kind of a seismic change? >> yeah, i do. since the topic is politics and then to add that a lot of people widely credited in 18
event such as japan experienced has ranged in terms of lessons learned just beyond the energy sector and the nuclear industry to many other areas that could experienced similar events. >> a que. mr. inaba, going back to the effect on the auto industry, are there any changes in return of the resiliency of supply chain or things that have changed since fukushima? >> yes. i think there is a tremendous change taking place. i think we have probably about 400 tier one suppliers but anything beyond that, tier two even down to tier 5, we assume that the supply chain is like a sheep of pyramids and the tier one suppliers take share of the two, three and four out what we found in this case especially the same conductor company it is almost like a spindle, and therefore we have to make an infestation of all of the supply chains all the way down to tier five, so this work has started and what we found is there are about 2,000 critical parts where there is only one single supplier or juan special material for use and therefore there is no replace a devotee on stuff like that. so from then onward
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9